Title Image

Health and Safety

 

Health and Prevention News and Recommendations

 

EARLY SEASON PREPARATION

Get physical; run, walk, bike, swim etc.
At a minimum, a couple of workouts prior to your first few games
Have an annual physical
Have your blood pressure checked, easily done at any pharmacy and if it’s high or low, get in to see your doctor
If you have risk factors for heart disease (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, family history) discuss with your doctor a pre-season or early season stress test, especially if you are inactive during the off season

GAME PREPARATION

Pre-game warm up – stretch, skate a few laps and then stretch again
Don’t eat a large meal or drink alcohol before a game
Notify your captain of medical conditions (strokes/heart attacks, high blood pressure, diabetes, previous injuries, etc.) in case anything happens during the game
Notify your captain of the medications you are allergic to, in a medical emergency paramedics need this information

DURING THE GAME

Drink plenty of water or a sports drink
If you have chest/arm pains, discomfort, dizziness or nausea, trouble breathing, let your team mates know

 

LOCATIONS OF “AED” DEVICES

 

SPORTSWORLD ARENAS (2)

1ST DEVICE IS LOCATED IN THE MAIN LOBBY IN FRONT OF THE VIEWING AREA TO THE “SPECTATOR ICE”

2ND DEVICE IS LOCATED DIRECTLY ABOVE THE 1ST UNIT,UP THE STAIRS ON THE 2ND LEVEL

 

RIM PARK (5)

1ST DEVICE IS LOCATED BESIDE RECEPTION IN THE MAIN LOBBY

2ND DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE 2ND FLOOR AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS OFF THE MAIN LOBBY BETWEEN THE “RIVIERA ROOM” AND THE WASHROOMS

3RD DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE 2ND FLOOR AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS FROM THE WATERLOO SPORTS MEDICINE OFFICE BESIDE “HOUSEKEEPING H-203”

4TH DEVICE IS LOCATED IN THE LOWER EAST END CONCESSION ,BESIDE THE WATERLOO MINOR HOCKEY OFFICE

5TH DEVICE IS LOCATED IN THE HALLWAY BEHIND THE “OPTIMIST RINK” aka. RIM#2 IN FRONT OF GYMNASIUM #3

 

AUDITORIUM COMPLEX (5)

1st DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE DESK INSIDE THE MAIN OFFICE IN THE LOBBY

2ND DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE WALL BESIDE THE ENTRANCE TO THE “ KINSMEN”

SPECTATOR LOUNGE

3RD DEVICE IS LOCATED BETWEEN DRESSING ROOMS 12-13 ON THE AUDITORIUM ICE

4TH DEVICE IS LOCATED BESIDE DRESSING ROOMS 10-8 ON THE “KIWANIS RINK”

5TH DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE LOWER ICE LEVEL ACROSS FROM THE ELEVATOR AND THE RANGERS FITNESS AREA BESIDE THE “KIWANIS RINK”

 

ACTIVA COMPLEX

1ST DEVICE IS ON THE LOWER FLOOR UNDER THE STAIRS, BESIDE THE ENTRANCE TO THE “PATRICK DOHERTY” RINK

2ND DEVICE IS UP THE STAIRS, DIRECTLY ABOVE THE 1ST DEVICE

 

DON MCLAREN – GRAND RIVER – LION’S

UNITS ARE ALL LOCATED IN THE LOBBY AREAS

 

FIRST AID KITS

 

First aid kits are available at every game and are with the timekeepers.

 

TRAINING

 

First Aid, CPR, AED, Contact your Health & Prevention committee for details. See your handbook or contact Steve Lyon for further information.

CONCUSSIONS

What is a Concussion?

-A disturbance in brain function caused by a direct or indirect force to the head

-Results in a variety of non-specific signs/ symptoms such as: headache, unsteadiness, confusion, fatigue, change in personality

If a direct/ indirect blow to the head occurs, the player should IMMEDIATELY stop participation and be evaluated by the team/ referees

Quick sideline assessment for concussion:

-Loss of consciousness

-Balance or motor incoordination (stumbles, slow)

-Disorientation or confusion

-Loss of memory (before or after event)

-Blank or vacant look

-Visible facial injury

If any signs or symptoms of a concussion are suspected they should not be permitted to return to the game and seek medical attention, such as family physician the next day.

A hit to the head can sometimes be associated with a more serious brain injury, please proceed to the emergency room if any of the following:

-Deteriorating mental status

-Potential spinal injury

-Progressive, worsening symptoms (such as above)

If you are at all concerned about a fellow player’s mental status, please do not hesitate to call 911

Special attention to those who are on blood thinners such as (warfarin, elicit, xarelto, pradaxa, plavix) as they may be at increased risk of brain bleeds from head injuries.

Key to management of a concussion is complete physical and mental brain rest, which will include time off work and no sports participation.  Your physician should implement a gradual return to work/ sport plan with you.  You should not return to hockey until you have been completely symptom free for 1 week.

Dr. Claire Harlick BScN, MD, CCFP

Family Medicine Locum- New Vision Family Health Team

St Mary’s General Hospital- Palliative Care

Stroke has a new indicator…

 

Blood Clots/Stroke – They Now Have a Fourth Indicator, the Tongue

STROKE: Remember the 1st Three Letters….. S. T. R.

STROKE IDENTIFICATION:

During a BBQ a woman stumbled and took a little fall – she assured everyone that she was fine (they offered to call paramedics)… she said she had just tripped over a brick, because of her new shoes.

They got her cleaned up and got her a new plate of food. While she appeared a bit shaken up, Jane went about enjoying herself the rest of the evening.

Jane’s husband called later telling everyone that his wife had been taken to the hospital – (at 6 PM Jane passed away.) She had suffered a stroke at the BBQ. Had they known how to identify the signs of a stroke, perhaps Jane would be with us today. Some don’t die. They end up in a helpless, hopeless condition instead.

It only takes a minute to read this.

A neurologist says that if he can get to a stroke victim within 3 hours he can totally reverse the effects of a stroke…totally. He said the trick was getting a stroke recognized, diagnosed and then getting the patient medically cared for within 3 hours, which is tough.

RECOGNIZING A STROKE

Thank God for the sense to remember the ‘3’ steps, STR. Read and Learn!

Sometimes symptoms of a stroke are difficult to identify. Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer severe brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke.

Now doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions:

S *Ask the individual to SMILE.

T *Ask the person to TALK and SPEAK A SIMPLE SENTENCE (Coherently)
(i.e., It is sunny out today.)

R *Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS.

If he or she has trouble with ANY ONE of these tasks, call emergency number immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.

New Sign of a Stroke ——– Stick out Your Tongue

NOTE: Another ‘sign’ of a stroke is this: Ask the person to ‘stick’ out his tongue. If the tongue is ‘crooked’, if it goes to one side or the other, that is also an indication of a stroke.

A cardiologist says if everyone who gets this e-mail sends it to 10 people, you can bet that at least one life will be saved.

HEART MATTERS Q & A

 

-is there any way[s] that the average person[with no symptons] can confirm that he or she may have arterial blockage without going through a hospital procedure eg angiogram etc?
Possibly a stress test. They put you on a treadmill and attach electrodes to your heart and see if supply can keep up with demand. Can do with chemicals in some as too obese or otherwise unwell to do activity. Not a perfectly accurate test but less invasive.

-if a person has no known cardiovascular issues[high blood pressure,diabetes,high cholestorol level etc],isn’t overweight,doesn’t drink or smoke,can he or she still have arterial blockage that could cause a heart attack or stroke?
Unfortunately yes. But this does not mean we need to investigate everybody.

-can high blood pressure cause arterial blockage? If so,how?
It shears cholesterol off vessel walls and takes it frther downstream where the river is thinner..Also high BP makes your heart work harder as it is pumping against a higher pressure system. This makes your heart bigger and stiffer (like Arnold shwartzenegger). With the heart we don’t want Arnold, we want Abebe Bikila (the long distance runner)

-can high levels of stress cause arterial blockage? If so,how?
Yes it can. Depression can triple your risk of heart attack. We don’t totally understand.. possible neiro-hormone related and stress can make your arteries “twitchier”. Also-in the case of angina, stress simply increases your heart rate which can tip you into symptoms.

-does most arterial blockage occur near the heart? If so,why?
No can happen anywhere there are arteries and muscles. Just that your heart is your most important muscle (some would argue the brain)

-is clearing the blockage with an angioplasty and stent more efffective and superior to a bypass? If so,why?
Tough one. Not more effective and you have to usually repeat more often but less invasive. For people who have one or two bad arteries probably preferable. Also good evidence that graded exercise very effective for single vessel disease.

-what are the chances of the bypass clogging after the procedure[assuming the person has followed doctor’s orders 100% after the operation] ie what is average number of number of years before clogging could start to occur?
Most benefit. Not sure the exact failure rate but I think about 20% and increases w time. More if just get angioplasty or stent,.10 years or so brings you back to pre-risk but in some has longer lasting maybe die to lifestyle

-of all the factors that cause arterial blockage, what is the #1 factor and the one you are concerned about most?
Sedentary.

-is there any foods, liquids, non-prescriptive pills, tablets, special diets etc that are effective in aiding the self-cleansing process of the arteries? If there are, could they possibly clear minor clogging of the arteries eg 10 to 40% clogging over a period of time?
Short answer. Aspirin, colourful vegetables, Mediterranean diet.daily activity- walking.Positive outlook.

-if you were to recommend the very best book on the heart and related issues for the average person, what would it be?
Not sure maybe heart for dummies and “love in the time of cholesterol” for more of a story.

 

More articles on health and hockey can be found on the following web sites:

Healthy Heart Hockey Tips
http://ottawa.ca/residents/health/living/activity/adults/heart_hockey_en.html

Play Safe Tips for the Senior Hockey Player
http://ww2.heartandstroke.ca/Page.asp?PageID=1613&ContentID=10605&ContentTypeID=1

Preventing athletic injuries: Tips for weekend warriors
https://www.healthforums.com/library/1,1258,article~10530,00.html

CBC News: Weekend hockey players at risk for heart attack: study
http://www.cbc.ca/health/story/2002/02/04/hockeyheart020204.html

CAHRA – Fit for Hockey Program
http://www.carha.ca/index.cfm?action=Membership.FFH
http://www.carha.ca/index.cfm?action=news.sfpf