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Health and Safety

Covid -19 Protocols: Updated Oct 25, 2021

All players must have and complete the following at each game:

1) Proof of double vaccination

  • the final dose of the COVID-19 vaccine must be at least 14 days before providing the proof of being fully vaccinated.

2) Personal identification

3) Mask on at entry and while in the building, in the change rooms (until helmet goes on) and reverse until exit from the building

4) Sign screening protocol and contact tracing sheet provided by your captain.

KW Oldtimers Hockey Club Safety Plan

(Kitchener, October 25, 2021) 

 

We can expect the 2021/22 season of KWOH to be challenging.  Covid 19 will not cooperate with our plans and so it will be incumbent upon each of our members to do all they can to protect themselves and, by doing so, protect the entire membership from unnecessary transmission of the virus.

To that end, players, referees and timekeepers should abide by the following guidelines.

–   All players / officials / timekeepers must be double vaccinated before they will be allowed to participate in the KWOH league.   Ideally, the 2nd dose is to be administered at least 2 weeks prior to a participant’s first league game.  (Anti-bodies for the Covid 19 virus acquired from a previous infection will NOT be considered acceptable immunity.)

–   Players / officials / timekeepers are advised to not attend games if they are exhibiting symptoms, or if they discover they have been exposed to someone that has the virus.  Under these circumstances, they are to notify the KWOH Covid Committee, they should be tested for Covid-19, and they should abide by Public Health directions regarding any period of self-quarantine.

–   Masks are required for all individuals entering an arena.

–   All participants must be masked while in the dressing room.

–  Arena access will be limited to 30 minutes prior to a scheduled game.

–   All participants must exit the arena within 30 minutes of getting off the ice.

–   To the extent possible, players / participants need to maintain a physical distance of at least 2 meters in the dressing rooms.

–   All players and participants will be prohibited from sharing any hockey equipment such as jerseys, water bottles, sticks, etc.

–   Within the arena, players / officials / timekeepers should avoid touching their eyes, nose or mouth.

–   Players / officials / timekeepers should cover their mouth and nose with a tissue or an arm when coughing or sneezing

–   Players / officials / timekeepers should abstain from spitting

–   Players / officials / timekeepers should wash their hands before and after a game.   Similarly, the use of antibacterial hand sanitizer is recommended before and after games.

KWOHC will regularly check with local Public Health, and with the province of Ontario, to update these guidelines and ensure the KWOHC is following best practices to reduce the risk of transmission during league activities.

Screening/Contact Tracing

Prior to each game, team captains will require each participant to complete a questionnaire about their physical health (considering the provincial list of COVID-19 symptoms) and about possible Covid-19 exposure.

This KWOH pre-game Covid-19 screening documentation will be kept for a minimum of 30 days by the captains of each team.

KWOHC will periodically check with the local Public Health unit as well as provincial health authorities to ensure our screening protocol is up to date.

Changes to the KWOH screening protocols and to our risk mitigation procedures will be communicated via email, the KWOH website, in person and over the phone via the convenors and captains of each division.

Game-time potential exposures

In the event that a player or participant is ill during a hockey game with symptoms that may be Covid-19 (when unsure, assume yes), teams will be instructed to proceed as follows:

Step#1:   Immediately have the symptomatic person leave the game and arena.  (If the player/participant is very ill, call 911.)

Step#2:   Ask the ill person to contact their doctor or Telehealth Ontario at Toll-free: 1-866-797-0000 for further directions about testing for Covid-19.

Post-game potential exposures

If, after a hockey game is over, a player or participant is found to have been infected with Covid-19 and potentially contagious while playing said game, the following procedures will ensue.

Step 3:   Player advises KWOH Covid Committee of positive infection.

Step 4:   KWOH Covid Committee will receive Public Health direction.

Step 5:   If so directed in Step 4, KWOH Covid Committee will inform any players / officials / timekeepers that they may have been exposed to Covid-19 (based on the contact tracing lists) and that they should abide by the Public Health guidance from step 4.

 

Resources:
Ontario Public Health:
https://covid-19.ontario.ca/
Waterloo Region Public Health – 519-575-4400
https://www.regionofwaterloo.ca/en/health-and-wellness/2019-novel-coronavirus.aspx

KW Oldtimers Hockey Club Safety Plan

(Waterloo, October 25, 2021)

 

We can expect the 2021/22 season of KWOH to be challenging.  Covid 19 will not cooperate with our plans and so it will be incumbent upon each of our members to do all they can to protect themselves and, by doing so, protect the entire membership from unnecessary transmission of the virus.

To that end, players, referees and timekeepers should abide by the following guidelines.

–   All players / officials / timekeepers must be double vaccinated before they will be allowed to participate in the KWOH league.   Ideally, the 2nd dose is to be administered at least 2 weeks prior to a participant’s first league game.  (Anti-bodies for the Covid 19 virus acquired from a previous infection will NOT be considered acceptable immunity.)

–   Players / officials / timekeepers are advised to not attend games if they are exhibiting symptoms, or if they discover they have been exposed to someone that has the virus.  Under these circumstances, they are to notify the KWOH Covid Committee, they should be tested for Covid-19, and they should abide by Public Health directions regarding any period of self-quarantine.

–   Masks are required for all individuals entering an arena.

–   All participants must be masked while in the dressing room.

–    Arena access will be limited to 30 minutes prior to a scheduled game.

–   All participants must exit the arena within 30 minutes of getting off the ice.

–   To the extent possible, players / participants need to maintain a physical distance of at least 2 meters in the dressing rooms.

–   All players and participants will be prohibited from sharing any hockey equipment such as jerseys, water bottles, sticks, etc.

–   Within the arena, players / officials / timekeepers should avoid touching their eyes, nose or mouth.

–   Players / officials / timekeepers should cover their mouth and nose with a tissue or an arm when coughing or sneezing

–   Players / officials / timekeepers should abstain from spitting

–   Players / officials / timekeepers should wash their hands before and after a game.   Similarly, the use of antibacterial hand sanitizer is recommended before and after games.

KWOHC will regularly check with local Public Health, and with the province of Ontario, to update these guidelines and ensure the KWOHC is following best practices to reduce the risk of transmission during league activities.

Screening/Contact Tracing

Prior to each game, team captains will require each participant to complete a questionnaire about their physical health (considering the provincial list of COVID-19 symptoms) and about possible Covid-19 exposure.

This KWOH pre-game Covid-19 screening documentation will be kept for a minimum of 30 days by the captains of each team.

KWOHC will periodically check with the local Public Health unit as well as provincial health authorities to ensure our screening protocol is up to date.

Changes to the KWOH screening protocols and to our risk mitigation procedures will be communicated via email, the KWOH website, in person and over the phone via the convenors and captains of each division.

Game-time potential exposures

In the event that a player or participant is ill during a hockey game with symptoms that may be Covid-19 (when unsure, assume yes), teams will be instructed to proceed as follows:

Step#1:   Immediately have the symptomatic person leave the game and arena.  (If the player/participant is very ill, call 911.)

Step#2:   Ask the ill person to contact their doctor or Telehealth Ontario at Toll-free: 1-866-797-0000 for further directions about testing for Covid-19.

Post-game potential exposures

If, after a hockey game is over, a player or participant is found to have been infected with Covid-19 and potentially contagious while playing said game, the following procedures will ensue.

Step 3:   Player advises KWOH Covid Committee of positive infection.

Step 4:   KWOH Covid Committee will receive Public Health direction.

Step 5:   If so directed in Step 4, KWOH Covid Committee will inform any players / officials / timekeepers that they may have been exposed to Covid-19 (based on the contact tracing lists) and that they should abide by the Public Health guidance from step 4.

 

Resources:
Ontario Public Health:
https://covid-19.ontario.ca/
Waterloo Region Public Health – 519-575-4400
https://www.regionofwaterloo.ca/en/health-and-wellness/2019-novel-coronavirus.aspx

 

 

 

 

Emergency First Aid Course:

Emergency First Aid and Adult CPR for the KWOHC on Saturday, January 15, 2022, from 8:30am – 4:30 pm.  There is a maximum of 10 participants for the course to be held at St. John Ambulance, 250 Gage Avenue, Kitchener. The KWOHC handles all registration fees. Individuals interested in attending should contact David Gillies at dgillies1127@rogers.com prior to the beginning of December.

Health and Safety News and Recommendations

Informational Video on Stokes

EARLY SEASON PREPARATION

Get physical; run, walk, bike, swim etc.
At a minimum, a couple of workouts prior to your first few games
Have an annual physical
Have your blood pressure checked, easily done at any pharmacy and if it’s high or low, get in to see your doctor
If you have risk factors for heart disease (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, family history) discuss with your doctor a pre-season or early season stress test, especially if you are inactive during the off season

GAME PREPARATION

Pre-game warm up – stretch, skate a few laps and then stretch again
Don’t eat a large meal or drink alcohol before a game
Notify your captain of medical conditions (strokes/heart attacks, high blood pressure, diabetes, previous injuries, etc.) in case anything happens during the game
Notify your captain of the medications you are allergic to, in a medical emergency paramedics need this information

DURING THE GAME

Drink plenty of water or a sports drink
If you have chest/arm pains, discomfort, dizziness or nausea, trouble breathing, let your team mates know

 

LOCATIONS OF “AED” DEVICES

 

SPORTSWORLD ARENAS (2)

1ST DEVICE IS LOCATED IN THE MAIN LOBBY IN FRONT OF THE VIEWING AREA TO THE “SPECTATOR ICE”

2ND DEVICE IS LOCATED DIRECTLY ABOVE THE 1ST UNIT,UP THE STAIRS ON THE 2ND LEVEL

 

RIM PARK (5)

1ST DEVICE IS LOCATED BESIDE RECEPTION IN THE MAIN LOBBY

2ND DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE 2ND FLOOR AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS OFF THE MAIN LOBBY BETWEEN THE “RIVIERA ROOM” AND THE WASHROOMS

3RD DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE 2ND FLOOR AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS FROM THE WATERLOO SPORTS MEDICINE OFFICE BESIDE “HOUSEKEEPING H-203”

4TH DEVICE IS LOCATED IN THE LOWER EAST END CONCESSION ,BESIDE THE WATERLOO MINOR HOCKEY OFFICE

5TH DEVICE IS LOCATED IN THE HALLWAY BEHIND THE “OPTIMIST RINK” aka. RIM#2 IN FRONT OF GYMNASIUM #3

 

AUDITORIUM COMPLEX (5)

1st DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE DESK INSIDE THE MAIN OFFICE IN THE LOBBY

2ND DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE WALL BESIDE THE ENTRANCE TO THE “ KINSMEN”

SPECTATOR LOUNGE

3RD DEVICE IS LOCATED BETWEEN DRESSING ROOMS 12-13 ON THE AUDITORIUM ICE

4TH DEVICE IS LOCATED BESIDE DRESSING ROOMS 10-8 ON THE “KIWANIS RINK”

5TH DEVICE IS LOCATED ON THE LOWER ICE LEVEL ACROSS FROM THE ELEVATOR AND THE RANGERS FITNESS AREA BESIDE THE “KIWANIS RINK”

 

ACTIVA COMPLEX

1ST DEVICE IS ON THE LOWER FLOOR UNDER THE STAIRS, BESIDE THE ENTRANCE TO THE “PATRICK DOHERTY” RINK

2ND DEVICE IS UP THE STAIRS, DIRECTLY ABOVE THE 1ST DEVICE

 

DON MCLAREN – GRAND RIVER – LION’S

UNITS ARE ALL LOCATED IN THE LOBBY AREAS

 

FIRST AID KITS

 

First aid kits are available at every game and are with the timekeepers.

 

TRAINING

 

First Aid, CPR, AED, Contact your Health & Prevention committee for details. See your handbook or contact Steve Lyon for further information.

CONCUSSIONS

What is a Concussion?

-A disturbance in brain function caused by a direct or indirect force to the head

-Results in a variety of non-specific signs/ symptoms such as: headache, unsteadiness, confusion, fatigue, change in personality

If a direct/ indirect blow to the head occurs, the player should IMMEDIATELY stop participation and be evaluated by the team/ referees

Quick sideline assessment for concussion:

-Loss of consciousness

-Balance or motor incoordination (stumbles, slow)

-Disorientation or confusion

-Loss of memory (before or after event)

-Blank or vacant look

-Visible facial injury

If any signs or symptoms of a concussion are suspected they should not be permitted to return to the game and seek medical attention, such as family physician the next day.

A hit to the head can sometimes be associated with a more serious brain injury, please proceed to the emergency room if any of the following:

-Deteriorating mental status

-Potential spinal injury

-Progressive, worsening symptoms (such as above)

If you are at all concerned about a fellow player’s mental status, please do not hesitate to call 911

Special attention to those who are on blood thinners such as (warfarin, elicit, xarelto, pradaxa, plavix) as they may be at increased risk of brain bleeds from head injuries.

Key to management of a concussion is complete physical and mental brain rest, which will include time off work and no sports participation.  Your physician should implement a gradual return to work/ sport plan with you.  You should not return to hockey until you have been completely symptom free for 1 week.

Dr. Claire Harlick BScN, MD, CCFP

Family Medicine Locum- New Vision Family Health Team

St Mary’s General Hospital- Palliative Care

Stroke has a new indicator…

 

Blood Clots/Stroke – They Now Have a Fourth Indicator, the Tongue

STROKE: Remember the 1st Three Letters….. S. T. R.

STROKE IDENTIFICATION:

During a BBQ a woman stumbled and took a little fall – she assured everyone that she was fine (they offered to call paramedics)… she said she had just tripped over a brick, because of her new shoes.

They got her cleaned up and got her a new plate of food. While she appeared a bit shaken up, Jane went about enjoying herself the rest of the evening.

Jane’s husband called later telling everyone that his wife had been taken to the hospital – (at 6 PM Jane passed away.) She had suffered a stroke at the BBQ. Had they known how to identify the signs of a stroke, perhaps Jane would be with us today. Some don’t die. They end up in a helpless, hopeless condition instead.

It only takes a minute to read this.

A neurologist says that if he can get to a stroke victim within 3 hours he can totally reverse the effects of a stroke…totally. He said the trick was getting a stroke recognized, diagnosed and then getting the patient medically cared for within 3 hours, which is tough.

RECOGNIZING A STROKE

Thank God for the sense to remember the ‘3’ steps, STR. Read and Learn!

Sometimes symptoms of a stroke are difficult to identify. Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer severe brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke.

Now doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions:

S *Ask the individual to SMILE.

T *Ask the person to TALK and SPEAK A SIMPLE SENTENCE (Coherently)
(i.e., It is sunny out today.)

R *Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS.

If he or she has trouble with ANY ONE of these tasks, call emergency number immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.

New Sign of a Stroke ——– Stick out Your Tongue

NOTE: Another ‘sign’ of a stroke is this: Ask the person to ‘stick’ out his tongue. If the tongue is ‘crooked’, if it goes to one side or the other, that is also an indication of a stroke.

A cardiologist says if everyone who gets this e-mail sends it to 10 people, you can bet that at least one life will be saved.

HEART MATTERS Q & A

 

-is there any way[s] that the average person[with no symptons] can confirm that he or she may have arterial blockage without going through a hospital procedure eg angiogram etc?
Possibly a stress test. They put you on a treadmill and attach electrodes to your heart and see if supply can keep up with demand. Can do with chemicals in some as too obese or otherwise unwell to do activity. Not a perfectly accurate test but less invasive.

-if a person has no known cardiovascular issues[high blood pressure,diabetes,high cholestorol level etc],isn’t overweight,doesn’t drink or smoke,can he or she still have arterial blockage that could cause a heart attack or stroke?
Unfortunately yes. But this does not mean we need to investigate everybody.

-can high blood pressure cause arterial blockage? If so,how?
It shears cholesterol off vessel walls and takes it frther downstream where the river is thinner..Also high BP makes your heart work harder as it is pumping against a higher pressure system. This makes your heart bigger and stiffer (like Arnold shwartzenegger). With the heart we don’t want Arnold, we want Abebe Bikila (the long distance runner)

-can high levels of stress cause arterial blockage? If so,how?
Yes it can. Depression can triple your risk of heart attack. We don’t totally understand.. possible neiro-hormone related and stress can make your arteries “twitchier”. Also-in the case of angina, stress simply increases your heart rate which can tip you into symptoms.

-does most arterial blockage occur near the heart? If so,why?
No can happen anywhere there are arteries and muscles. Just that your heart is your most important muscle (some would argue the brain)

-is clearing the blockage with an angioplasty and stent more efffective and superior to a bypass? If so,why?
Tough one. Not more effective and you have to usually repeat more often but less invasive. For people who have one or two bad arteries probably preferable. Also good evidence that graded exercise very effective for single vessel disease.

-what are the chances of the bypass clogging after the procedure[assuming the person has followed doctor’s orders 100% after the operation] ie what is average number of number of years before clogging could start to occur?
Most benefit. Not sure the exact failure rate but I think about 20% and increases w time. More if just get angioplasty or stent,.10 years or so brings you back to pre-risk but in some has longer lasting maybe die to lifestyle

-of all the factors that cause arterial blockage, what is the #1 factor and the one you are concerned about most?
Sedentary.

-is there any foods, liquids, non-prescriptive pills, tablets, special diets etc that are effective in aiding the self-cleansing process of the arteries? If there are, could they possibly clear minor clogging of the arteries eg 10 to 40% clogging over a period of time?
Short answer. Aspirin, colourful vegetables, Mediterranean diet.daily activity- walking.Positive outlook.

-if you were to recommend the very best book on the heart and related issues for the average person, what would it be?
Not sure maybe heart for dummies and “love in the time of cholesterol” for more of a story.

Mental Health

In any given year, 1 in 5 people in Canada will personally experience a mental health problem or illness. Mental illness affects people of all ages, education, income levels, and cultures. Approximately 8% of adults will experience major depression at some time in their lives. Mental illness can be treated effectively. Depression and anxiety can be helped by seeing your doctor. For additional resources please see:

Understanding Mental Illness

More articles on health and hockey can be found on the following web sites:

Healthy Heart Hockey Tips
http://ottawa.ca/residents/health/living/activity/adults/heart_hockey_en.html

Play Safe Tips for the Senior Hockey Player
http://ww2.heartandstroke.ca/Page.asp?PageID=1613&ContentID=10605&ContentTypeID=1

Preventing athletic injuries: Tips for weekend warriors
https://www.healthforums.com/library/1,1258,article~10530,00.html

CBC News: Weekend hockey players at risk for heart attack: study
http://www.cbc.ca/health/story/2002/02/04/hockeyheart020204.html

CAHRA – Fit for Hockey Program
http://www.carha.ca/index.cfm?action=Membership.FFH
http://www.carha.ca/index.cfm?action=news.sfpf